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Old 05/30/2019, 01:53 PM   #1
Jyetman
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What media filters Ozone

I have a sharper image ionic air filter. They went out of business because they lied about the products. If they produce high amounts of ozone why can't I affix sheets of carbon media to the air-out vents? Will this reduce the high amounts of ozone being produced? Will it become safe to use the filter?


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Old 05/30/2019, 02:01 PM   #2
mcgyvr
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Just press the off button or unplug it


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Old 05/30/2019, 08:42 PM   #3
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Carbon media might help, at least for a while. Most activated carbon filters are good for a few hours in air, but the ozone might be reactive enough to make it worthwhile. If there's an ozone risk, though, I'd just replace the filter. If you want to do some experiments, you'd need an ozone sensor to do much.


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Old 05/30/2019, 09:00 PM   #4
Jyetman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bertoni View Post
Carbon media might help, at least for a while. Most activated carbon filters are good for a few hours in air, but the ozone might be reactive enough to make it worthwhile. If there's an ozone risk, though, I'd just replace the filter. If you want to do some experiments, you'd need an ozone sensor to do much.
Are there any decent ozone sensors available under $50 like on amazon?


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Old 05/30/2019, 09:56 PM   #5
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I don't know of any, but I haven't had a need for one. Some quick searching found only higher-priced units.


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Old 06/13/2019, 02:20 PM   #6
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Can you smell O3?


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Old 06/19/2019, 08:00 PM   #7
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Can you smell O3?
not after i put the carbon sheets on it.


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Old 06/19/2019, 10:51 PM   #8
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So I'd guess that the ozone is reactive enough to keep the activated carbon working. That's useful to know. I hope the residual ozone level is low.


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Old 08/19/2019, 04:24 AM   #9
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If you cannot smell the effluvia right at the exhaust vent, then the levels of Ozone are loo low to be a health hazard to you. Keep your small pets out of the room for extra safety, and make sure the room is reasonably well vented. Also keep any plants in the room at least 3 or 4 meter away. Ozone is rather unstable, and does not last terribly long. At room temperature, it has a half-life of roughly 1 day. Ozone levels considerably below that considered dangerous to humans (~0.1ppm) will, however, cause many hydrocarbons - particularly rubber and some plastics - to degrade far faster than would otherwise be the case.

Ozone is damaging to mucous membranes and respiratory tissues. Any individual with asthma, COPD, or other respiratory issues should definitely avoid exposure. Graphite - usually in the form of activated charcoal - is very effective at removing Ozone from the air. It is a cery pungent and acrid gas, so detecting fairly small concentrations of it is usually very easy.


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Old 08/19/2019, 04:30 AM   #10
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To clarify, if you cannot smell Ozone right at the exhaust vent, then you should be OK. Even a hint of Ozone is too high a concentration to which to be continuously exposed. Many people are unable to smell Ozone even at marginally hazardous levels.


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Old 08/26/2019, 08:34 PM   #11
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To clarify, if you cannot smell Ozone right at the exhaust vent, then you should be OK. Even a hint of Ozone is too high a concentration to which to be continuously exposed. Many people are unable to smell Ozone even at marginally hazardous levels.
With the thick carbon sheets covering the entire vent I cannot smell anything. With carbon sheets off there's a strong ozone smell so will be changing carbon sheets every several months.


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Old 08/27/2019, 06:43 PM   #12
lrhorer
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With the thick carbon sheets covering the entire vent I cannot smell anything. With carbon sheets off there's a strong ozone smell so will be changing carbon sheets every several months.
Actually, I am not so sure that is necessary. Eventually, of course, the carbon will need to be changed. However, unlike organic matter, the Ozone should not clog the pores of the Carbon filter media. The Ozone reacts with the Carbon to produce Oxygen and CO2, buth of which should float away. Over time, the media will become eroded, but I expect this will take quite a long time. I would guess replacing the media every couple of years will likely suffice.


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Old 08/31/2019, 12:54 PM   #13
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Actually, I am not so sure that is necessary. Eventually, of course, the carbon will need to be changed. However, unlike organic matter, the Ozone should not clog the pores of the Carbon filter media. The Ozone reacts with the Carbon to produce Oxygen and CO2, buth of which should float away. Over time, the media will become eroded, but I expect this will take quite a long time. I would guess replacing the media every couple of years will likely suffice.
Thank You


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